Bash get unicode character from encoded char

Use hexdump to lookup the 6-digit unicode sequence. Examples for bash and python are given.

$ echo -n| hexdump
0000000 e2 9c 93
0000003

To print the character, escape the 6-digit / 3 byte unicode sequence. Use -e with echo to interpret the escaped characters.

$ echo -e "\xE2\x9c\x93"

Example with color and subscripts on the command line:

$ echo -e 'O\xe2\x82\x82 Sensor: \x1b[1;32m\xE2\x9c\x93\x1b[0m'
O₂ Sensor: ✓

To print the unicode character in python, do the following:

>>> print "\xE2\x9c\x93"

List of colors for bash prompt:

# Reset
Color_Off='\e[0m'       # Text Reset
 
# Regular Colors
Black='\e[0;30m'        # Black
Red='\e[0;31m'          # Red
Green='\e[0;32m'        # Green
Yellow='\e[0;33m'       # Yellow
Blue='\e[0;34m'         # Blue
Purple='\e[0;35m'       # Purple
Cyan='\e[0;36m'         # Cyan
White='\e[0;37m'        # White
 
# Bold
BBlack='\e[1;30m'       # Black
BRed='\e[1;31m'         # Red
BGreen='\e[1;32m'       # Green
BYellow='\e[1;33m'      # Yellow
BBlue='\e[1;34m'        # Blue
BPurple='\e[1;35m'      # Purple
BCyan='\e[1;36m'        # Cyan
BWhite='\e[1;37m'       # White
 
# Underline
UBlack='\e[4;30m'       # Black
URed='\e[4;31m'         # Red
UGreen='\e[4;32m'       # Green
UYellow='\e[4;33m'      # Yellow
UBlue='\e[4;34m'        # Blue
UPurple='\e[4;35m'      # Purple
UCyan='\e[4;36m'        # Cyan
UWhite='\e[4;37m'       # White
 
# Background
On_Black='\e[40m'       # Black
On_Red='\e[41m'         # Red
On_Green='\e[42m'       # Green
On_Yellow='\e[43m'      # Yellow
On_Blue='\e[44m'        # Blue
On_Purple='\e[45m'      # Purple
On_Cyan='\e[46m'        # Cyan
On_White='\e[47m'       # White
 
# High Intensity
IBlack='\e[0;90m'       # Black
IRed='\e[0;91m'         # Red
IGreen='\e[0;92m'       # Green
IYellow='\e[0;93m'      # Yellow
IBlue='\e[0;94m'        # Blue
IPurple='\e[0;95m'      # Purple
ICyan='\e[0;96m'        # Cyan
IWhite='\e[0;97m'       # White
 
# Bold High Intensity
BIBlack='\e[1;90m'      # Black
BIRed='\e[1;91m'        # Red
BIGreen='\e[1;92m'      # Green
BIYellow='\e[1;93m'     # Yellow
BIBlue='\e[1;94m'       # Blue
BIPurple='\e[1;95m'     # Purple
BICyan='\e[1;96m'       # Cyan
BIWhite='\e[1;97m'      # White
 
# High Intensity backgrounds
On_IBlack='\e[0;100m'   # Black
On_IRed='\e[0;101m'     # Red
On_IGreen='\e[0;102m'   # Green
On_IYellow='\e[0;103m'  # Yellow
On_IBlue='\e[0;104m'    # Blue
On_IPurple='\e[0;105m'  # Purple
On_ICyan='\e[0;106m'    # Cyan
On_IWhite='\e[0;107m'   # White
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4 comments

  1. anonymous

    more characters:

    check

    $ echo -n ✔|hexdump

    0000000 e2 9c 94

    0000003

    x

    $ echo -n ✖|hexdump

    0000000 e2 9c 96

    0000003

    arrow

    $ echo -n ➜|hexdump

    0000000 e2 9e 9c

    0000003

  2. anonymous

    These color codes are incomplete for some reason beyond my knowledge and fail sometimes when a line is too long, overwriting the prompt's first line content and producing weird behaviours because prompt won't start a new line or even go one line up.

    In order for these color codes to work (at least in ubuntu), you need to replace

    \e with [\033 and add at the end of every code \].

    So instead of

    Red='\e[0;31m'         # Red

    You should type

    Red='\[\033[0;31m\]'         # Red

  3. anonymous

    It's also possible to get the unicode sequence on the command line using python:

    $ echo -n "✓" | python -c 'import sys; print [sys.stdin.read()]'

    ['\xe2\x9c\x93']

  4. anonymous

    $ echo -n "”" | python -c 'import sys; print [sys.stdin.read()]'

    ['\xe2\x80\x9d']

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